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Launching of the World Conference against Nuclear Tests

The Kazakh capital, Astana, will host the official opening of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) storage facilities and the launch of the World Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty on August 29, 2017, the day chosen by Kazakhstan 2016 to launch an international conference for a nuclear-free world.

 

The conference will be attended by Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev, other official leaders and representatives from more than 50 countries as well as a large number of parliamentarians, arms control experts and regional and global religious leaders.

The celebration, which was first held on December 2, 2009 during the 64th session of the United Nations General Assembly, will be marked by events, activities and educational messages aimed at attracting world attention to uniting efforts to prevent further nuclear testing. Within the framework of initiatives that are part of the global effort to establish a world free of nuclear weapons.

The celebrations also aim at motivating the United Nations, Member States, intergovernmental organizations, non-governmental organizations, academic institutions and the media to inform and educate the public and States and to advocate the need to ban nuclear-weapon testing as a very important step towards a safer world.

The commemoration of this day contributes to many bilateral and multilateral governmental developments as well as broad moves in civil society, to advance the cause of the nuclear test ban.

WEAPONS ABANDONIG NITIATIVE

A quarter of a century ago, Kazakhstan chose voluntarily to abandon its nuclear arsenal, shutting down Semi Platinsk for nuclear tests with more than one and a half million human beings, and announced on August 29, 2016, the launch of an international conference for a world free of nuclear weapons.

Since its independence, Kazakhstan's attempts to activate international initiatives to prevent the spread of nuclear testing have not stopped and it joins a list of many countries seeking to achieve a world free of weapons of mass destruction.

Kazakhstan, in cooperation with its neighbors in Central Asia, formed a nuclear-weapon-free zone in 2009 and in 2013 hosted two rounds of talks between Iran and the five plus one group on Tehran's nuclear program. One of its most important initiatives to activate peaceful programs was the signing of an agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency 2015 to establish a bank for low-enriched uranium, the cost of this bank $ 150m, including the purchase of uranium and ensure its work for the first ten years.

The Government of Kazakhstan has a different vision. In 2009, President Nursultan Nazarbayev offered to host a nuclear fuel bank under the authority of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The project aims to encourage some countries not to go ahead with building their own uranium enrichment technologies. Rather, they will have access to low-enriched uranium for use as fuel in civilian nuclear reactors.

The official negotiations between the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Kazakhstan began. A delegation of the agency visited the proposed location of the bank in Ust Kamenogorsk and made a number of recommendations to the Government of Kazakhstan, which will operate in accordance with international standards, the impact on the environment and public health will be practically non-existent. "

Olba has been operating for more than 60 years in the region and enjoys high standards of safety and security (in the field).

The insistence of Kazakhi

Kazakhstan's leadership is proud of its history of nuclear non-proliferation. In 1991, the country closed the main nuclear laboratory of the former Soviet Union in Semipalatinsk. Over four decades, the region has seen more than 450 nuclear tests.

Kazakhstan voluntarily abandoned a huge arsenal of nuclear weapons it inherited after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Kazakhstan has become the world's largest uranium producer. With hosting talks on Iran's nuclear program, talking about the nuclear fuel bank, Kazakhstan's image has been strengthened as an appropriate sponsor of peace.